Foodborne Surveillance

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Foodborne Germs and Illnesses

Foodborne illness (sometimes called "foodborne disease," "foodborne infection," or "food poisoning) is a common, costly—yet preventable—public health problem. Each year, 1 in 6 Americans gets sick by consuming contaminated foods or beverages. Many different disease-causing microbes, or pathogens, can contaminate foods, so there are many different foodborne infections. In addition, poisonous chemicals, or other harmful substances can cause foodborne diseases if they are present in food.

 

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CDC

 

Salmonella

What is Salmonella?

Salmonella is a bacteria that makes people sick. It was discovered by an American scientist named Dr. Salmon, and has been known to cause illness for over 125 years. The illness people get from a Salmonella infection is called salmonellosis.

Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps between 12 and 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most individuals recover without treatment. In some cases, diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites. In these cases, Salmonella can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics. The elderly, infants, and those with impaired immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.

 

Salmonella and Live Poultry

 Contact with live poultry and their environment can make people sick with Salmonella infections. Live poultry can be carrying Salmonella bacteria but appear healthy and clean and show no signs of illness.

For more information on Salmonella and Live Poultry click on the links below:

Backyard Flock

 CDC

 

For more information on Salmonella prevention click on link below:

 CDC

 

 

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Crawfish Food Safety Tips:

            

Only live crawfish should be cooked, and crawfish should never be eaten raw.

  • Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and warm water before and after handling any raw food.
  • Wash cutting boards, dishes, utensils, and counter tops with soap and hot water between the preparation of raw foods, such as seafood, and the preparation of cooked or ready-to-eat foods.
  • Be sure to clean coolers with hot soapy water before packing cooked seafood. Cleaning is especially important if the cooler was previously used to transport raw seafood. A clean cooler prevents harmful bacteria from the raw fish from contaminating cooked seafood or other foods.
  • Cooked crawfish can be stored in the refrigerator in shallow dishes for 2-3 days. Cooked crawfish can be frozen for up to 3 months, to prolong freezer storage, remove fat to prevent rancidity

 

More information about seafood food safety can eb found at: http://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/ucm077331.htm

If you have food safety questions, call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline:1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854). The Hotline is open year-round Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET (English or Spanish). Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day

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