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National Memory Screening Program

Post Date:10/12/2018 4:22 PM

National Memory Screening Program in County Nov. 13-17

ANGLETON — As part of the Alzheimer's Foundation of America's National Memory Screening Program, the Brazoria County Alzheimer's Awareness Project will offer free, confidential memory screenings at nine Brazoria County libraries during the week of Nov. 13-17, except for Clute which will be the week before due to scheduled remodeling.

The individual library schedules are as follows:

 ALVIN: 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Nov. 13-17 at 105 S. Gordon St.

 ANGLETON: 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Nov. 13-17 at 401 E. Cedar St.

 BRAZORIA: 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Nov. 13-17 at 620 S. Brooks St.

 CLUTE: 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Nov. 6 and 8 in English; and Nov. 5 and 7 in Spanish at 215 N.    Shanks St.

 DANBURY: 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Nov. 14 and 16 at 1702 N. Main St.

 LAKE JACKSON: 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Nov. 13-16 at 250 Circle Way.

 PEARLAND: 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Nov. 13-17 at 3522 Liberty Drive.

 SWEENY: 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Nov. 13-17 at 205 W. Ashley Wilson Road.

 WEST COLUMBIA: 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Nov. 13, 14 and 15 at 518 E. Brazos Drive.

 Qualified health care professionals and/or trained volunteers will administer the memory screenings and provide educational materials about memory concerns, brain health, and caregiving. The face-to-face screenings consist of a series of questions and tasks lasting approximately 10 minutes.

 "This will be our seventh year to partner with the Brazoria County Library System to offer free memory screenings," said Dale Libby, chairman and CEO of the Gathering Place and coordinator for the Brazoria County Alzheimer's Awareness Project. "For the past six years, we have had the largest community-based memory screening project in the United States. We expect to make it seven years in a row."

 Memory screenings are an important part of successful aging and are gaining in popularity. Last year alone, the Alzheimer's Foundation of America screened more than 250,000 people through its National Memory Screening Program. Further, a recent study suggests that screenings may detect cognitive impairment up to 18 years prior to clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or dementia.

 AFA suggests memory screenings for anyone concerned about memory loss or experiencing warning signs of dementia; whose family and friends have noticed changes in them; who believe they are at risk due to a family history of dementia; or who want to see how their memory is now and for future comparisons. Warning signs of Alzheimer's disease include forgetting people's names and events, asking repetitive questions, loss of verbal or written skills, confusion and personality changes.

 Screeners emphasize that results are not a diagnosis, and encourage individuals who score below the normal threshold, as well as those who still have concerns, to see a neurologist for a thorough evaluation.

 There are more than 5.7 million Americans living with Alzheimer's disease and that number is expected to nearly triple by mid-century. Advanced age is the greatest known risk factor for the disease, which results in loss of memory and other intellectual functions, and is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.

 For information about the National Memory Screening Program, call 866-232-8484 or visit www.nationalmemoryscreening.org.

 The Brazoria County Alzheimer's Awareness Project is sponsored by the Brazoria County Health Department and Gathering Place Interfaith Ministries, a free respite provider in Brazoria County. The goals of the organization are to create awareness of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias and to promote early detection. BCAAP sponsors county-wide memory screenings in partnership with the Brazoria County Library System, and partners with area healthcare organizations, businesses, social service and government.

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